:: Gavin Bryars Ensemble


Nothing like the sun in Leeds & Prague

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

 

I haven’t sung Gavin Bryars’ great Shakespeare cycle since the Australia trip a couple of years ago (though we did Sonnet 128  with Alternative History in Querenca last week).  This  time I’ll be joined by Sarah Dacey (famous soprano from Juice – who many moons ago was the first student to brave doing an MA with me at York). The Leeds performance is at the Howard Assembly Rooms at 7.45 on Wednesday 25th, and then we go to Prague for a performance on the 27th at the Archa Theatre.

Alternative History

We had a great time in Portugal last week and I’m looking forward to our next gig in Poznan at the Nostalgia Festival on November 18th. Jake, Ariel and I will then record some Josquin back in the UK the following week. Our dedicated page on this site is now up and running and you can find more details of the project here.

Cecilia Frode’s Från det blå skåpet 

I’m back in Sweden for the last week November for the intriguing Cecilia Frode project with Serikon and Mare Balticum. I now know something of what Cecilia’s script is about and it’s fascinating to watch the audience’s reactions to Från det blå skåpet. And yes, I do wear tails but so do the women, and I get to wear blue shoes.  Duo Lingo tells me I’m only 13% fluent in Swedish. Better than the 1% I got down to earlier this year though.

I’m taking most of December off. This is what the current diary looks like:

October 25 Gavin Bryars Nothing like the sun Howard Assembly Rooms Leeds

October 28 Gavin Bryars Nothing like the sun Archa Theatre Prague

November 18 Alternative History Nostalgia Festival Poland

November 24 Josquin recording with Ariel Abramovich & Jacob Heringman

Novermber 29 Cecilia Frode/Serikon Från det blå skåpet: Teatern i Falkhallen Falkenberg

November 30 Cecilia Frode/Serikon Från det blå skåpet: Växjö Theatre

December 1 Cecilia Frode/Serikon Från det blå skåpet: Kalmar Teater

 

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Alternative History

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

Winestead

The final performances of Gavin Bryars’  Winestead in the New Music Biennial took place at London’s Festival Hall. It’s been great to spend so much time with one piece (and it’s a beautiful piece) and I hope there will be many more to come. The film, which like all films involving classical singing has too many shots of the inside of my throat, is available on YouTube. It was done in one take (very cleverly) on the afternoon of the first performance in Winestead church.

 Dowland to Sting in Catalunya

I’m soon off to Catalunya with Ariel Abramovich for three recitals in the Festival de Música Antiga dels Pirineus (FEMAP). where hopefully the weather will be a bit better than at our recent photo shoot.

The programme will be a mixture of Dowland and Campion with some Tony Banks, Sting and one of Jacob Heringman’s beautiful new Peter Pope intabulations. The first is in the Monestir de Sant Llorenç in Guardiola de Berguedà on July 28 at 22.00. The next day we go to Ordino in Andorra, where we’ll perform at the Museu d’Areny-Plandolit (20.00 start) and then on to the Refugi de l’Estany Gento in La Torre de Capdella on the 30th. As far as I can see this is a hut in the mountains, so it should be an intimate occasion. It starts at 6.00, presumably to allow time to climb back down the mountain for dinner.

Vibrato in the Proms

A few weeks ago I took part in a round table discussion about vibrato for Radio 3 with Peyee Chen, Helena Daffern, Janice Kelly and Richard Bethell.  Interestingly York-orientated – three of us were/are connected with the Music Department (and Richard Bethell gave a paper at the NEMA conference). We rabbited on for ages and the final 21 minute cut will be broadcast during the prom interval on August 6th. Not sure what Moussorgsky fans will make of it (my chosen example was June Tabor’s Finisterre).

Alternative History

 

 

ECM will release the new CD on August 25 worldwide.  I always pre-order a copy of my own albums on Amazon so that I can check it’s actually for real, but at £25+ I think that would be a bit silly (and they can’t spell Josquin…). You can get it from Amazon.de for 18.99 euros or from the US site for roughly the same in dollars. This is actually the first album I recorded with Anna Maria Friman, Ariel Abramovich and Jacob Heringman, and it’s the first purely ‘early music’ album I’ve done for ECM since Hilliard Ensemble days (we went on to record Amores Pasados which was then released first). It’s by no means conventional early music though, with motets and a mass in new versions for two voices and two vihuelas (with two teams of vihuelists: Ariel and Jacob for Victoria, and  Ariel with Lee Santana for Josquin). It’s called Secret History because although cannibalising ‘acapella’ polyphony and performing it in this way was typical of the 17th century, the  modern early music movement has generally focused on the first pristine incarnation of the music rather than what musicians subsequently did with it (the real history which is too often ignored).  We’ve been inspired by later sources – in this case the English 17th century Paston ms which has both Josquin and Victoria side by side (though not pieces we do on the album). A little late in the day the four of us have decided to name our whole project Alternative History. The Dowland Project didn’t have a name until its second release, so we’re going a bit further with only half the name on our second one.  A while back I did an interview with Jazz Views which puts it all in  context (though it pre-dates the name). Our first concerts under the new name will be in Poland and Portugal later this year, and we’ll tweet about them nearer the time.  We’ll also be using the name for any permutation of the four of us when we’re doing programmes informed by these ideas. Jake and Ariel have recently released Cifras Imaginarias (on Arcana), an album of 2-vihuela intabulations which works in a similar way, and the three of us are working on a Morales project for next year.

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September is busy, and will include a Conductus concert with Rogers Covey-Crump and Christopher O’Gorman, a gig with Serikon at the Luther conference in Uppsala, a recital with Jacob Heringman at our course in Benslow, and the first Mare Balticum events with Cecilia Frode in Sweden. I’ll update the diary properly in a bit.

photos Guy Carpenter

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Gavin Bryars and Winestead

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Yesterday’s event at Winestead was an extraordinary occasion. We did two performances of Gavin Bryars’ eponymous piece, having spent most of the day filming it as part of the Hull City of Culture project. The rector of St Germain’s church between 1614 and 1624 was Andrew Marvell, and it was there that he christened his son Andrew, who grew up to be the metaphysical poet. Gavin Bryars set lines from several Marvell poems which reflect the mysterious landscape of Holderness, and we performed them to an audience that included descendants of the poet himself. The evening was hosted by Nick Hillyard, himself a descendant of Nicholas Hilliard. The church is still lit only by candlelight, and once we had said goodbye to the elaborate film machinery, Marvell’s verses soared over Gavin’s music into the air that first welcomed them four centuries ago.

The film is being shown  at 7, Whitefriargate, Hull on Friday 30th June 5pm-8pm, Saturday 1st July 10am-7pm and Sunday 2nd July 12noon-7pm (admission free). We’ll be performing the piece again at the Albemarle Music Centre in Hull on June 30th (8.00 start, and also free) and it will be recorded and broadcast on Radio 3’s New Music Biennial slot the following evening. We then do it again at London’s Festival Hall on July 8th (3.00 start nb – also free admission with ticket).

 

Dowland to Sting in Catalunya

 

Ariel Abramovich and I are doing three recitals for FEMAP (Festival de Música Antiga dels Pirineus) in July. The programme will be a mixture of Dowland and Campion with some Tony Banks, Sting and one of Jacob Heringman’s beautiful new Peter Pope intabulations. The first is in the Monestir de Sant Llorenç in Guardiola de Berguedà on July 28 at 22.00.

 

Image result for Monestir de Sant Llorenç de Guardiola de Berguedà

 

The next day we go to Ordino in Andorra, where we’ll perform at the Museu d’Areny-Plandolit (20.00 start).

 

 

Finally we’re at the Refugi de l’Estany Gento in La Torre de Capdella on the 30th. As far as I can see this is a hut in the mountains, so it should be an intimate occasion. It starts at 6.00, presumably to allow time to climb back down the mountain for dinner.

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I’m taking August off before a very busy September hits. I’ll post updates about the release of Secret History (due end of August), and also of plans for the future of my project with Anna, Jake and Ariel. We’ve finally (a bit late)… settled on a name: Alternative History. It won’t appear on Secret History (well, half of it will…) but we’ll use it in future when any permutation of the four of us does music that reflects our take on Amores-Pasados-type-early-music-related-performance. More anon.

 

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John Paul Jones premiere at the Swaledale Festival

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

Amores Pasados at Grinton Church

We don’t often do gigs the UK, so when we do they’re really special. We were delighted to be in Grinton for the Swaledale Festival – pretty well home territory for Jacob Heringman and me, and Anna Maria Friman and Ariel Abramovich have often joined us in Yorkshire to rehearse so they’re almost local too. We’ve kicked off every secular programme with  John Paul Jones’ Amores Pasados  and we couldn’t resist doing it again this time, but we also premiered John Paul’s setting of Blake’s Cradle Song, which he wrote for us, having heard our York gig last year.

It was one our most memorable gigs ever, not only adding another fantastic JPJ piece to our repertoire, but being joined onstage by the man himself on mandolin and festival director Malcolm Creese on bass.

 

Musik i Syd

Before that Anna Maria Friman and I joined Daniel Stighäll and the Swedish ensemble Mare Balticum in Kristianstad, rehearsing a project for Musik i Syd with actress Cecilia Frode which will come to fruition with a tour in southern Sweden from the autumn onwards. I’ll post a list of dates nearer the time (there’s more info in Swedish here).

June 14-17 Nieder-Olm Festival for Young Voices

I’m returning to Nieder-Olm for another ensemble singing summer school with my old friend Werner Schüßler. There will be several young ensembles, who will take part in concerts in Kettenheim (16th) and Nieder-Olm (17th).

Werner’s new book is almost ready. This is a comprehensive and inspirational instruction manual for singers of all sorts. I’ve been metaphorically looking over his shoulder while Germany’s most famous Geordie has been working on this, the product of a lifetime’s engagement with singers of all descriptions.

Gavin Bryars Ensemble

June 22 Winestead, June 30 Hull, July 8 Royal Festival Hall, London

This will be a new commission from Opera North in connection with the City of Culture and the New Music Biennal (the ‘possibly one singer’ referred to is yours truly). Winestead church is believed to be where the poet Andrew Marvel was christened, and Gavin Bryars’ new work will have a Marvel text. The RFH concert is at 3.00 in the afternoon and tickets are free but you have to apply for them. You need a PhD in Googling to be able to do this…

 

Ongoing tenor musings

 

 

A couple of years ago I gave a paper at the Schwert Tenor: Mythos, Geschichte, Gegenwart conference and the book of the conference has just landed on my desk. It was a great conference and the book is full of interesting stuff – especially if you speak German. Mine’s the only chapter in English and it discusses the nature of the voice since recording began.

Red Byrd rides again

The progressive music site The Quietus has an interesting piece about Factory Classical, with a section on Red Byrd’s Songs of Love & Death album.  I prefer this pic to the rather boring one on  their site. There aren’t many of me in white trousers with red braces…

 

Well, it was the 1980s…

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Roaming with Fauvel

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

When the French poet Gervais de Bus wrote his epic satire featuring a corrupt egomaniac  sociopathic horse he probably wasn’t thinking that the wheel of Fortune (which also features in the plot) would come round again almost exactly 700 years later. My first engagement of the year took in both manifestations in rapid succession, with a performance of Presidentes in Thronis with Serikon in Sweden after which I was back in time for the anti-Trump demo in York (and we went straight on to La La Land to complete one of the most surreal 24 hour periods I can remember).  Musicians out there: if you want to protest, Fauvel is the perfect programming opportunity (it even has leaders adrift without a moral compass who can’t wait to curry favour with the beast).

I’ll be returning to Sweden with Serikon several times later in the year, and hopefully Fauvel will rear his ugly head at least one more.

 

It’s going to be another busy year. There will be a brief reunion with my old Hilliard Ensemble mates as we join Singer Pur for their twenty-fifth anniversary celebration at the Prinzregententheater in Munich on March 9. This collaboration was born at the Tampere Vocal Festival in the late nineties, after Singer Pur had won one of the major prizes. Klaus Wenk and I sat down to breakfast one morning and chewed over the idea of our two ensembles getting together at some point in the future. The project got off the ground with a commission from Joanne Metcalf, who’d been a winner in the Hilliards’ 1994 composition competition (and who wrote Doom-Begotten Music for me in 2003) and the two groups went on to do many concerts and a CD together after I left. Joanne will there for the concert, as will Gavin Bryars who is also a longstanding friend of the ensemble.

March 21 Ariel Abramovich and I will give a recital for the Wunderkammer in Trieste (there’s a Facebook page about it if you’re signed up). I haven’t been there since 1965 when hitch hiking through Europe after school. I went swimming with a Carabiniere who insisted on diving for oysters. I don’t think I even knew what an oyster was and having tried one I certainly wasn’t going to eat any more, so each time he brought one up I threw it back as soon as he submerged (possibly to bring up the same one over and over again). I’ll be trying a bit harder this time. Ariel and I will be doing our Dowland to Sting programme, which we’re also doing in July for a series of recitals in Catalunya in the FEMAP festival.

In May I’ll be returning to Sweden to rehearse the Musik i Syd project with Serikon and Ensemble Mare Balticum and then going on to Helsinki for some more PhD examining at the Sibelius Academy (and possibly some ensemble coaching if I can fit it in). Then the Amores Pasados season starts with a concert in the Swaledale Festival on June 4th. It’s possible that ECM will have released Secret History by then, and we’re still holding dates to record some of our new repertoire (including more fantastic pieces from John Paul Jones and Tony Banks).  In the middle of June I’ll be coaching in Germany, and at the end of the month Gavin Bryars’ new piece for the Hull City of Culture will have its first performance in Winestead church, followed by outings in Hull itself and the Royal Festival Hall. This project will renew Gavin’s association with Opera North, which began with the co-production with the RSC of  Nothing Like the Sun for the Shakespeare anniversary of 2006. One of the sonnets from Nothing Like the Sun is now in the Amores Pasados programme in Jacob Heringman’s arrangement for Anna Maria Friman, Ariel Abramovich, himself and me, and this will be on our new ECM recording. I’ll be working with Gavin again in the autumn with performances of Nothing Like the Sun  in Leeds and Prague, and there will be a new commission with his band for the 40th anniversary of the Triskel Arts Centre in Cork next year.

 

More details on all of the above in  due course.

 

 

 

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Amores Pasados at the NCEM

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

There’s something really special about doing a gig on your own doorstep. Apart from doing concerts with students at the university I’ve only ever performed in York courtesy of the NCEM and the Conductus Project, and it was great to be able to do Amores Pasados to the most friendly audience imaginable, largely made up of family and friends. It was also special because it was the first time my granddaughters Emily and Grace had been to a ‘proper’ concert, and it made the heart sing to see them there (and Grace making a beeline for John Paul Jones’ leg shows she’s already heading in the right direction).  We were privileged to have both John Paul  and Gavin Bryars up to hear their pieces for the first time. John Paul spent a lot of time with Jake and Ariel discussing tunings and scales for his new piece (and did some exquisite busking on the piano). It’s going to be  quick, he says (somewhat alarmingly).

 

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Twitter was alive with Zeppelin-inspired names of the superlute group these three might create…

Gavin Bryars’ Sonnet 128 from his Nothing Like the Sun is one of my favourite pieces. The original (the recording of our Adelaide performance is about to be released) has a rich texture of Gavin’s signature string quartet (2 violas, cello and bass) plus piano, guitar and cimbalom, and I was a bit worried he might find Jake’s miraculous two lutes arrangement a bit of a shock. He loved it and we managed to persuade him to join us for the postlude. I’d had the idea that as we got near the postlude, an old bloke would get up out of the audience and approach the piano, which he would then play. And sure enough it came to pass. Gavin didn’t knock over any chairs or glasses on his way, but apart from that it was a nicely successful surprise. We’re used to either grand Spanish churches where the lutes really carry or big theatres where we have to use PA, so we enjoyed the intimacy of the NCEM (though I suspect it wasn’t quite resonant enough for the lutes).

We continue to accumulate repertoire. The Warlock and Moeran pieces worked very well this time round, and there are more to come. Our next performances as an ensemble are in Germany: a late night in Blaibach on September 10th, then the Weltmusikfestival Murnau  October 23rd and Enjoy Jazz Heidelberg October 24th. That’s all for this year at the moment. We hope to return to the UK next year, and we  have concerts in Spain, Italy and Argentina in the diary at the moment.

 

 

 

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Amores Pasados comes to York

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Vote yes or stay at home?

Our gig at the NCEM York on June 9 will be our first (and at the moment, only) performance in the UK. It’s rather timely, a European ensemble giving a concert a couple of weeks before the referendum. Like many of my contemporaries I don’t get to perform in England very often. It’s a great place to live, but when it comes to audiences and fees (the two basic requirements for performers) the European mainland seems to be more able to come up with the goods. There are exceptions of course (thank you NCEM!) – though it’s weird (and slightly frightening) that after amazing gigs all over the European mainland our only UK performance is here in my home town.  As far as the referendum is concerned I’m almost (almost…) inclined to stay at home, so pathetic and vision-free has the Remain campaign been,  led by a bunch of opportunists who’ve been whingeing about Europe for decades and now find themselves having to justify it: none of them seems to know or understand anything about the Europe most performers inhabit.  The arts, scholarship and education are inextricably bound up with the European project, as the Guardian (rather late in the day) reminds us. Incidentally, I have a postal vote since I can never be sure I’m going to be around on election day, and my PhD wasn’t enough to enable me to understand the ballot form which I ‘spoiled’ by mistake by tearing off a bit of tear off stuff that was just asking to be torn off. I phoned the election help line several times to ask for a replacement, but they obviously have very long lunch breaks at the York chapter as no one has picked up so far. I hope we don’t lose by one vote.

 

Avila selfie

 

Amores Pasados – rock & reverse engineering

Amores Pasados has been a huge adventure. Our basic premiss is that a song is a song, whether it’s written by Schubert or Paul McCartney. If you’ve had vernacular language beaten out of you (as we of the English choral tradition mostly have) you can’t actually sing a Paul McCartney song without sounding like a middle class twat. But given a tune and harmony and a poetic text all sorts of things become possible, and you can tap in to some of the most creative song-writers around. I’ve been banging on about this for years, and John Paul Jones actually wrote his three Amores Pasados songs for Red Byrd back in the Eighties; it took decades to persuade Tony Banks to write me a lute song (and now we have four). As luck would have it, with serendipitous foresight in my 1998 book Vocal Authority I suggested Sting singing early music would be revelatory and sure enough, having listened to my Dowland album (among many others) along the way, he eventually did.  When Ariel Abramovich was a student at the Schola Cantorum he shared a room in Basel with Edin Karamazov, who would become Sting’s lutenist many years later. As students at the Schola, Ariel and Edin both played in a Hilliard early/new music project involving Swiss composers, putting up with the old gits that we were even then. So getting Sting to agree to give us a song only took an email or two. Russell Crowe had rejected his contribution to the Robin Hood film (not the right stuff, apparently) and Sting kindly passed it on to me.  And it turned out that Jake Heringman had even played the lute at one of Sting’s parties. It was clearly meant to be.

The other strand of our work is the reverse-engineering of 20th century English song, creating lute songs that Warlock. Quilter,  Moeran and others would surely have written had they known any lutenists.   Philip Heseltine, aka Peter Warlock, transcribed hundreds of lute songs, bringing them into the 20th century light as songs with piano. His obsession with 17th century music and poetry was shared by many of his contemporaries, especially his drinking buddy Jack Moeran. Their music is as lyrical and pastoral as Dowland, as English as the songs of Genesis and Sting. We’re fortunate that Jacob Heringman choses not to fly anywhere, which means that the many hours he’s spent crossing Europe by train have enabled him to work lutey magic on other people’s piano parts, bringing  back into circulation a repertoire that fell out of fashion a generation 0r two ago.

York Festival of Ideas

The NCEM concert is part of the university’s Festival of Ideas. Our insistence that a song doesn’t need to be Winterreise to have artistic value would probably qualify on its own (a sort of counter-intuitive Leeds Lieder…).  We’re also acknowledging the Shakespeare centenary:  as well as bardic connections from Warlock and Moeran there will be the first performance of Tony Banks’ That time of Year (Sonnet 73) and a unique version of Gavin Bryars’ Sonnet 128, originally written for the last Shakespeare fest,  which may have a surprise or two in store.

Tickets

Tickets are selling fast but can still be had at a special discount if you quote voucher code AP 241 (https://tickets.ncem.co.uk/en-GB/shows/amores%20pasados/info

or ring 01904 658338).

 

 

 

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May news

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

I had a lovely time in Canada, as I always do. From the moment  you arrive at Immigration Canadians welcome you (so different from the US). Peter-Anthony Togni’s Responsio is a great piece to sing, and for these performances I got to stand next to Jeff Reilly so got the full impact of his amazing bass clarinet playing. May 3rd I was in Winchester cathedral with Gavin Bryars for more danced Laude as part of the Yorke Dance Project. We were just one part of a major sacred dance event that included the Winchester University Gospel Choir.  As usual we were terrifically moved by the dancers – and what a building for such a project.

Christopher Robinson’s 80th birthday evensong

I was in Cambridge a week later to celebrate Christopher Robinson’s 80th birthday. He’s one of those people who’s had a huge effect on my life, inviting me to join the Worcester cathedral choir and thereby rescuing me from the Guildhall School of Music (whose principal had said it was his duty to ensure I became an opera singer). It was my first job, and Christopher encouraged me to audition for the BBC, which led to our doing programmes of English song together (my first broadcast recitals). Singers from all of his former choirs  joined the St John’s choir for a celebratory evensong. It was a magnificent occasion with a mighty noise lofted to the vaulting on the wings of Elgar and Howells. I managed to keep up until Dear Lord and Father of Mankind at the end. As I was snivelling into my tissue the tenor behind me laid a hand on my shoulder. I feel a bit like that too, he said.

Conductus in Cambridge

I was back in Cambridge for the Conductus concert and workshop on the 14th. This was the last AHRC sponsored event in the UK (there’s a final one in Besalu on July 16/17th; our Three Choirs Festival concert on July 26th will be a new departure).  We had a great time – fabulous workshop (‘there’s a lot of intellect here…’ Rogers observed), in many ways the most rewarding we’ve done. It was great to see so many old friends – and very gratifying that the pioneering work of Selene Mills is in very safe hand with the new CEM team. The perfect acoustic of Little St Mary’s and the beautiful light streaming in more than made up for the fact that performing in the afternoon felt distinctly weird. To our great surprise we sold a huge number of CDs, so we must have been doing something right.

Amores Pasados in York

Not long to the first UK Amores Pasados at the National Centre for Early Music in York on June 9th.   Tickets are available on line at: https://tickets.ncem.co.uk/en-GB/shows/amores%20pasados/info and if you use the coupon code AP241 you can get a  special 50% discount offer on full and concession tickets (or ring 01904 658338).

We’ll be doing several Shakespeare settings including a beautiful new setting of Sonnet 73 by Tony Banks as well as Jacob Heringman’s version of Gavin Bryars’ Sonnet 128 (originally written for Anna and me as part of his Nothing Like the Sun project commissioned by the RSC and Opera North). ECM have a new album page for the CD. This doesn’t have tour dates like the release page, but these can be found here. I can confirm that John Paul Jones is working on a new piece for the autumn for us, having finished his opera.

 

P1070578a

photo: Maria Silvera

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Amores Pasados & Conductus

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Beverley minster

The diary for the next few weeks looks like this:

May 21: 3 Medieval Tenors Beverley Early Music Festival
Conductus: the forgotten song of the middle ages

This is the first of our AHRC-funded concerts this year. It’s a lunchtime concert with a morning workshop and the programme will include at least one piece probably not performed for 800 years. You can book tickets here.

We’ll have copies of Conductus 1 & 2 for sale (no news yet of Conductus 3 but we’re hoping for September).

June 2-5: Tampere International Vocal Festival (Finland)

Tampere

 

The ensemble singing season is in full swing. I’ll once more be chairing the ensemble jury at Tampere and am looking forward to some great music making. My fellow jurors are Jussi Chydenius from Rajaton, Anna Maria Friman from Trio Mediaeval, Anders Jalkeus from The Real Group and singer and composer Jenny Wilhelms-Seppälä. I’ve just heard that the German Ensemble Nobiles that Werner Schüßler and I have coached on a couple of occasions were prize winners at the Leipzig Acappella Festival run by the legendary Amarcord ensemble who attended Hilliard Ensemble summer schools when they were just starting out.

June 10: Durham: 3 Medieval Tenors Conductus: the forgotten song of the middle ages

Details still emerging but we’re expecting a workshop 2.00 – 4.00 and a concert at 8.00. Programme as for Beverley.

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 June 12: Amores Pasados Aranjuez Festival (Spain)

This will be the launch of the ECM CD and our first live performance of the programme. We’ll do all the music from the album plus some Dowland, Finzi, Vaughan-Williams and C W Orr. We’ll have copies of the album for sale (it’s available on advance order from Amazon.de on advanced order for June 12.

The US release is a bit later, and copies can be ordered for July 17 on Amazon.com

AP cover

 

June 22: UK/Ireland release of Amores Pasados

 

June 21: Gavin Bryars Ensemble Glasgow

This is a Laude programme danced by the Stephen Pelton Dance Theatre. Tickets are available here

July 2: Amores Pasados Santiago de Compostela

Our second visit to Spain in three weeks. More to come in Spain later in the year, and also in Poland, Germany, Ireland and Cuba.

July 6: Brussels: 3 Medieval Tenors Conductus: the forgotten song of the middle ages

Workshop and concert at the MedRen Conference. The concert is in the beautiful abbaye de la Cambre. Details still sketchy but you should be able to get more information here. More Conductus gigs in the UK, Germany and Slovenia later in the year.

July 10: recording Roger Marsh’s Poor Yorick

 

Shandy Hall

I’ll be joining fellow ex-Hilliards at Shandy Hall to record the setting of Sterne that Roger wrote for the Hilliards’ 40th anniversary tour in 2013.

July 19: Selene Mills Memorial Concert Great St Mary’s Cambridge

Join the ex-Hilliards and many old friends to celebrate the life of Selene Mills.

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Upcoming concerts

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

 

This week I’m off to the Adelaide Festival where Gavin Bryars is composer in residence. I’ve been several times to the East and West coasts of Australia but this will be my first visit to the south. I’m hoping to see Gavin’s Marilyn Munroe opera soon after we arrive, then we have a GBE gig at which Peyee Chen and I will sing his (Blake) Morrison Songbook and a selection of Irish Madrigals and Laude. Then we have the wonderful Shakespeare sonnet cycle Nothing Like the Sun, with the magical spoken voice of Gavin Friday. It’ll be a pretty intense few days – super-charged essence of Bryars. And the sun should be shining…

3 Medieval Tenors

250px-Cathedral_of_St._Martin_in_Bratislava,_overview

Not long after arriving home I’ll be heading for Bratislava for a Three Medieval Tenors concert in the cathedral on March 16th. I love Bratislava – it’s not only very beautiful but it has a proper cultural community that’s up for anything – and the cathedral is a wonderful building (I’ve performed there with the Dowland Project); it’s the perfect acoustic for the Conductus programme.

The next Three Med Tens concert is on May 21st in Beverly Minster (seating is limited and tickets are selling fast, so don’t miss it if you’re in Yorkshire). Our next visit to the north is Durham on June 9 or 10, then we have the Med Ren conference in Brussels July 6th, Radovljica on August 13th, Nieder Olm the week of September 10-17, and Brighton on September 19th. All of these have AHRC workshops where you can sign up (for free) to learn about the history of Conductus and how to perform this extraordinary musical/poetic hybrid music. They’re open to all, and there will be something for everyone whatever their previous musical experience.

Amores Pasados

ECM have confirmed that the album will be released in May/June, and we’ll be having a Spanish launch at the Aranjuez Festival (near Madrid) on June 13th with further concerts in Spain, Germany and Ireland later in the year. The programme will include all the music from the album, plus more of each of the three genres represented (new songs by rock musicians, early 20th century English song transcriptions, and 17th century lutesongs).

 

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