:: Greenhouse


Greenhouse!

Monday, September 2nd, 2019

So what do singers do between gigs apart from preparing for the next one? From childhood I’ve had a mild obsession with flying. This began with model gliders built from kits and then getting a glider pilot’s licence as a teenager, and reached a high point when I went hang gliding between gigs with the Swingles.

I still have an assortment of flying models, though these tend to be electric nowadays (I even have a rather frightening vertical take-off machine).  I’ve also had instrument-building phases – an Italian harpsichord and a couple of psalteries, all from kits. But when you reach a certain age it’s the law that you have to get into gardening, and gardening means greenhouses. We don’t have anywhere  really suitable to put a greenhouse, but when we had our ancient Georgian-type windows replaced with double-glazed copies there was only one thing to do with the old windows. There’s nothing in the literature about not putting a greenhouse under an apple tree (can’t think why) so that’s where it is, up against the shed.

It began with a model, created by Penny and based on the available windows, some of which I would have to cut up, with additional panes created to fill any gaps.

Then I had to get bricklaying, which turned out to be every bit as therapeutic as everyone says it is; and we bought and restored an old door.

 

And I bought some tomato plants…

The roof fitted magically as it was the top halves of each of our old bedroom windows (the vertical ones being the bottom bits). It left a narrow strip at the top, too small for any of the remaining spare windows but perhaps solvable with wooden vents.

Then we remembered the apple tree, and that apples can rain down for several months in the summer and autumn. So we temporarily double glazed the roof with acrylic (it’s held on with Velcro), in the hope that the apples will bounce off. So far, so good…

In the meantime, the tomatoes continued to rocket and were joined by a couple of cucumbers;

Then Nigel Wood, who made our new windows, got in touch to say he’d finished the last remaining one, a copy of the Yorkshire sliding sash in our attic. Quite by chance the old sliding sash, cut in half and with a few additional bits, gave us two proper opening glass vents after all.

So that was the spring and summer days off taken care of. Now I have to figure out how to use it once we’ve eaten the tomatoes. Over the winter I’m going to fit it out with shelves, seed trays,  a potting area, loads of tiny pots and things like that.