:: Jacob Heringman


In darkness – the making of…

Friday, March 1st, 2019

To commemorate our REMA performance on Brexit Eve (March 28) Jacob Heringman and I persuaded Guy Carpenter to create a video to go with our recent recording of Dowland’s In Darkness Let me Dwell (originally recorded for Mark Burghagen’s Sacred King film).  The inspiration for the shoot was a session the three of us did last year at a ruined cottage high up in the Dales, and the plan this time was for us to walk along an appropriately Brexit-like cliff edge and arrive at the ruin where we would again burn our scores to keep warm in the post-Brexit landscape. The window of opportunity consisted of  a just a few hours of the one day we were all free, which miraculously turned out to be the hottest winter day ever with the most amazing light.

We walked for what seemed like hours through the heather, with spectacular views on all sides

as the sun got lower and more dazzling with each step

until Guy launched his drone.

We had to work quickly as the clock (Brexit-like…) ticked away, so  we set off on our cliff-edge trek into the sunset,

eventually arriving at our destination, where we lit the fire

and managed to get it all in the can before the sun sank out of sight

 

You can see the result on YouTube here

Projects for 2019

Friday, December 7th, 2018

In darkness…

My last event of 2018 was recording John Dowland’s In darkness let me Dwell with Jacob Heringman for Mark Burghagen’s film of the final soliloquy in Shakespeare’s Richard II launched in February  on the anniversary of the King’s death in 1400.  Dowland’s most melancholic piece  seemed not only appropriate for the Shakespeare but also for most of the likely Brexit scenarios. This Guy Carpenter photo of Jake and me in a post-Brexit landscape (burning our scores to keep warm) is the inspiration for a video that we’re making to coincide with our private valedictory performance to European early music promoters on Brexit Eve, which will use In Darkness as the sound track.

Alternative History

On February 15 the Alternative History ensemble got back together for gigs in Madrid (Amores Pasados) and Barcelona (an all-Josquin programme). It was a great start to what promises to be another busy Alternative History year  and the press loved both events:

Rompiendo barreras con “Amores pasados: de Dowland a Sting”, de Alternative History

Desprez en la intimidad

http://revistamusical.cat/critica/ars-perfecta/

The various fractals of the Alternative History project will also be busy, and I’ll be doing recitals with both Ariel Abramovich and Jacob Heringman. Jake and I have more UK gigs,including  John Casken’s Alwinton Summer Music, which will feature a composition competition for a new lute song. We’ll then repeat the winning entry in York’s Late Music series. John Casken wrote Sharp Thorne – one of the Hilliard Ensemble’s signature pieces – and it will be great to catch up with him again. Jake and I will also be doing concerts in York (including a special Brexit themed event on Brexit Eve for the REMA conference at the NCEM) and we’ll repeat our Dufay mass with countertenor David James in Portugal.

Bryars and Beyond

I’ll be doing Gavin Bryars’ Nothing Like the Sun in Hull in April and returning to Trollhättan for the TrollhättansTidig Musik-dagar with Serikon in May, and there will be new collaborations in the summer. More soon…

Trio Mediaeval

Plans for the new project with Trio Mediaeval are coming on apace. The programme is called Machaut and the Kings of Cyprus, and will celebrate the extraordinary connection between Reims and Nicosia at the end of the 14th century and the beginning of the 15th. The manuscript known to musicologists (but not to many performers or audiences) as Torino J.II.9 is an extraordinary collection of ars subtilior polyphony and chant by a single unknown author who clearly knew the music of Guillaume de Machaut. We will bring the two strands together in performances of the Machaut mass and a Cypriot mass of a generation or two later.  At the moment we have concerts lined up in Norway, Germany and the UK (details to follow when we’ve worked out a coherent schedule). 

 

Anglo-German Adventures

Sunday, May 20th, 2018

 

I first visited Germany on my way to Istanbul, hitch-hiking between school and university. My friend Nick, who was bolder than I, blagged us a lift from the car deck on the ferry and we were dropped somewhere in Germany. Off the Autobahn we found ourselves apparently lost in the countryside, but were soon picked up by a lorry from a nearby brewery. The driver was politely amused by our schoolboy German (I’d just scraped an O level) and reached behind to pass us a bottle each. The three of us happily slurped away until he dropped us off at an inn for lunch. That’s the kind of welcome a teenager doesn’t forget. A few weeks later we were in what was then Yugoslavia and were picked up by German shirt smuggler (if I understood him correctly) and he took us most of the way to Turkey, stopping near the border at a mountain spring where he treated us to fresh yogurt and gherkins. I’d never had either before and can still taste them.

I’ve been enjoying German hospitality ever since, one way or another. I got to know towns I’d never heard of through concerts with the Hilliard Ensemble. The group could have survived handsomely just on the German gigs alone (and, of course, we had a famous German record company). The hypothecated church tax meant that most churches had more money than they knew what to do with, and concert promotion was a great way to spend it.  The group’s success meant that when we started our summer school series we had many applications from some amazing German singers. Singer Pur and Amarcord, for example, went on to become world famous; some students returned each year with different ensembles and are still firm friends. The person we most have to thank is Werner Schüßler, who not only introduced us to scores of wonderful German musicians but rescued the summer school and was responsible for bringing it to Schloss Engers on the Rhine.   Werner is an educator extraordinaire (as his recently published book on singing comprehensively demonstrates) and has coached hundreds of young singers over the years (and I’ve been delighted to join him on numerous occasions). He has a particular affinity with Northern England (he speaks fluent Geordie) and is a frequent visitor to this part of the world. At 3.30 on Tuesday 29th May he will be presenting two of his student ensembles in York Minster’s Chapter House. If you can get there, come and support these young singers (I’ve coached them myself too, and can guarantee you’ll have a great time). It’s a wonderful programme including music by Hildegard von Bingen, Mendelssohn, Rheinberger and Whitacre among others, which should sound stunning in the Chapter House acoustic.   If you miss them, on the 31st they can be heard in a lunchtime concert at St Andrew’s Corbridge (12.30) followed by evensong at Hexham Abbey at 6.30.

 

English Music Festival

The previous weekend (Saturday 26th at 2.15) Jacob Heringman and I will be opening the latest edition of our Book of Lost Lute Songs at Sutton Courtenay church (where George Orwell is buried).  The first half of the programme is a sort of Paston tribute, with movements from all three Byrd masses and motets (sung and played) by Tallis, Byrd, Dowland and Anon. The second half is an all-Heringman intabulationfest of music by Warlock, Butterworth, Moeran, Stephen Wilkinson, Peter Pope and Tony Banks. Quite a lot of this we’ll be doing in versions we haven’t tried before; it will be our third recital in England this year – a record for me. Jacob can also be heard with Ariel Abramovich in the Swaledale Festival on June 7th (sold out but you might get returns). The three of us will be joining Anna Maria Friman for Alternative History gigs in Poland, Ireland, Spain, Sweden, the UK and the Canary Islands later in the year.

 

 

 

Life after Josquin…

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

A luxury of lutenists

 

Jacob Heringman  &  Ariel Abramovich

(with John Paul Jones, centre)

 

I don’t know what the collective noun for lutenists is, but I’m very fortunate to work with two amazing players, Ariel Abramovich and Jacob HeringQman (John Paul’s preferred instrument after the bass guitar is the mandolin…). Together, they are the creative engine room of the Alternative History project which has produced the ground-breaking Amores Pasados and Secret History albums for ECM. The Alternative History diary for this year includes concerts in Krakow, Cork, York, London, Gothenburg, Seville, Cadiz and the Canaries, and the three of us also have plans for a programme that combines the calm subtlety of renaissance lute duets with the virtuosic mayhem of the jazz-like ‘division repertoire’ of the early 17th century. Ariel and Jake can be heard as a duo in the Swaledale Festival on June 7th, but book soon as they are likely to sell out.

escaping to Ecuador with Ariel Abramovich

[photo Guy Carpenter]

In addition to our quartet with Anna Maria Friman, I do separate programmes with Ariel  and Jacob. Ariel and I are celebrating ten years of concerts together, most recently in the Canary Islands and Ecuador, and we will be returning to Spain (our more familiar stamping ground) later in the year. Our repertoire has focused heavily on English lute songs, notably Dowland and Campion, and our current programme In This Trembling Shadow, combines this with intabulations of Byrd and Victoria.  Our performance of the Byrd 3 voice mass in Quito at around 3000 metres above sea level may be the highest Byrd has flown (I was actually offered oxygen before our first gig…).

[photo Guy Carpenter]

Jacob and I first worked together so long ago that neither of us can remember when, and Jake’s concern for our carbon footprint has serendipitously led to our doing more concerts in the UK. Our most recent work has evolved under the title ‘Life After Josquin’ and taps into both Jacob’s well-known work on Josquin intabulations and the ‘Alternative History’ way of doing things.  The title refers to the renaissance practice of re-inventing choral music as lute-based chamber music with (or without) voice(s) which often continued to be performed long after the composers were dead.  Jake has become adept at tabbing not only Josquin and his contemporaries but also twentieth & twenty-first century choral music and songs. Especially those called Peter (as in Warlock, Pope and Erskine).

April 22: Life After Josquin in York

The intabulation repertoire was created for informal performances at home, and it was probably the way most people heard renaissance polyphony (the choral interpretations beloved of the early music movement were relatively rare). Having said that, modern performances (whatever the Besetzung) invariably happen in a concert environment that is not remotely domestic, and although you can finesse the repertoire itself you can’t really avoid ‘Performing’ it. On April 22 Jacob Heringman and I will have a unique opportunity to explore this repertoire in something like a renaissance environment, courtesy of  Thomas and Jo Green who occasionally put on concerts in their house in York.  The plan at the moment is to repeat most of the Life After Josquin programme that we did in Newcastle in February, but in keeping with the informal nature of the event we will probably make it up as we go along (taking requests might be a bit tricky but not out of the question). It should be the perfect acoustic environment for the lute, but it will present interesting challenges for me as a singer: even my ‘early-music-lite’ way of singing would be a bit in yer face in a roomful of 20 people, so I’ll be experimenting with an even more speech-like delivery than usual. God knows what it’ll sound like, but it’ll certainly be the closest I’m likely to get to what we used to call an authentic performance.

May 26: The Book of Lost Lute Songs at the English Music Festival

Jake and I will be appearing next at the English Music Festival on May 26th at All Saints church Sutton Courtenay Oxfordshire (2.15 start). This programme takes the intabulation principle into more recent music. The first half will be all Tallis, Dowland and Byrd (excerpts from all three masses); the second half will consist of Jake’s intabulations of Warlock, Butterworth and Moeran, and of more recent pieces by Peter Pope, Stephen Wilkinson and Tony Banks. The festival was a little wary of including the latter (it’ll be Follow thy fair Sun from Amores Pasados) but I hope they’ll be reassured after the success of Tony’s orchestral album 5. 

 

Peter Erskine writes for Alternative History

We’re thrilled that American jazz legend Peter Erskine has written a new piece for us (with words by Anne Hills and intabulation by Jake).  Ash and Snow will be premiered in Krakow in August and we’ll also do it at Triskel in Cork (now re-scheduled for September after the snow beat us last time) .

 

S(no)w business like…

Thursday, March 1st, 2018

 

STOP PRESS! Triskel concert re-scheduled for Sept 21!

 

Triskel travel terminated…

We tried very hard to get to Cork for the Alternative History concert in Triskel’s 40th birthday series but the weather gods eventually won.  Jacob Heringman got as far as Holyhead before turning back after my flight was cancelled. After all Tony Sheehan’s hard work to get us there I just wanted to cry, but we’ll have another go later in the year. If you’re sitting in Cork airport with a cancelled flight, the album is on Spotify… or you can catch us soon in Poland, Spain, the UK or the Canary Islands.

Islas Canarias

So I now have a few days off before going to the Canary Islands with Ariel Abramovich for the Sacred Music Festival. Our programme there is a new one and is the first in our 10th anniversary season. The title In This Trembling Shadow comes from the eponymous song in Dowland’s  Pilgrim’s Solace. We’ll also be doing the famous Thou Mighty God trilogy from the same book, Campion’s Author of  Light and motets by Victoria. In between there will be movements from Byrd’s 3 voice mass.

The first recital is at the Iglesia de Santa Brigida in Gran Canaria on March 16th. We then go to Tenerife and the Iglesia de Las Clarisas in  La Laguna on March 17th, and finally to the Iglesia San Francisco in Sta.Cruz de La Palma. Three evenings of intensive music making in amazing churches (and much as love snow it’ll be relief do go somewhere where there isn’t any).

Tristram Shandy

I come back to England for the Tristram Shandy celebration on March 22nd before re-joining Ariel in Madrid the next day on our way to Ecuador.  For the concert at St George’s Hanover Square I’ll be getting together briefly with my old Hilliard Ensemble colleagues for a performance of Roger Marsh’s Poor Yorick. This promises to be a hugely entertaining evening with readings and music on the 250th anniversary of Sterne’s funeral in the same building.

Festival Internacional de Música Sacra Quito

This will be my first visit to Ecuador, and Ariel and I will be opening the sacred music festival with In This Trembling Shadow, and once again we’ll perform in extraordinarily beautiful churches. The schedule looks like this:

  • Sunday, March 25 Church of El Carmen Alto. 18.00
  • Monday, March 26 Variety Theater Ernesto Albán. 11.00 Master class.
  • Monday, March 26 Church of the company. 7:30 PM

Flammarion Correspondences

I get a week off at Easter (unlike  most of my fellow tenors who are frantically Bach-ing away with the seasonal passions), then at the beginning of April I’ll be spending a week at Trinity Laban working on Edward Jessen’s Flammarion Correspondences. This is a preliminary exploration with a production company intended to produce promotional material which will appeal to theatrical promoters in the UK and Europe. We’re aiming at a work-in-progress preview on Friday April 13th.

 

Life after Josquin

Jacob Heringman and I had the first outing of our Josquin programme at Newcastle University last week. We were asked not to cross the picket line and to cancel the concert, but I came to an amicable understanding with the union having gently I pointed out that they were expecting us to give up our meagre fee so that they could have a better pension and I couldn’t recall any of my old academic colleagues volunteering a pay cut so freelance musicians could be paid more. I was all prepared to thank a tiny audience for crossing the line and announce that we nevertheless supported the strike, but was completely wrong-footed when we went on stage to one of the biggest audiences for a lute song recital that I’ve seen for a while.

Our next performance, probably of this programme or something very like it, will be one of the smallest at a house concert in York.  We’ll be doing two performances (with tea and biscuits!): 2.30 for 3.00 or around 4.30 for 5.00 on April 22nd.  Unlike our previous one in the hugely resonant King’s Hall this will be very intimate, and perhaps not unlike listeners in the early 17th century might have experienced it (I don’t think I’ve ever performed in such a minimal acoustic, and I hope it doesn’t sound like my front room).  You can book a seat here but be quick as it’s likely to be full.

In May we’ll be back to a more resonant acoustic in the 12th century church of All Saints Sutton Courtenay. We’ll be doing parts of all three Byrd masses as well as Jake’s transcriptions of Warlock, Moeran, Peter Pope and Stephen Wilkinson at the English Music Festival.

 

There’s a longer list of ECM-related gigs on the ECM site.